Pocahontas (Reproduction of 1616 Original)

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-D416-18753 Annotation: This image is taken from a painting made of the Native American woman popularly known as Pocahontas, from a painting by William Sheppard. The portrait is dated 1616, coinciding with her only voyage to England in June of that year. The image is one of two strikingly similar…

Exercises of the Youths

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-37992 Annotation: This engraving shows native youths shooting arrows, throwing balls at target placed atop tall pole, and running races. Year: 1591

Champlain Exploring the Canadian Wilderness

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-3019 Annotation: This print shows Samuel de Champlain and two companions looking at a river as Indians carry the canoes to the shore. Born in the small Atlantic port of Brouage around 1580 to a Protestant family (although he became a Catholic), Samuel de Champlain fought in Henri IV’s army…

The Dances at their Great Feasts

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZ62-37992 Annotation: This engraving shows native youths shooting arrows, throwing balls at target placed atop tall pole, and running races. Year: 1591

The First Americans

The Death of Columbus

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: lithograph Museum Number: 91721148 Year: 1893

Death of Columbus, 1502

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: doors Museum Number: Annotation: The Columbus Doors that stand at the east entrance of the U.S. Capitol Rotunda are an imposing sight. They stand nearly 17 feet tall and weigh 20,000 pounds. The artist was Randolph Roger, and his alto-relief bronze doors make a powerful statement about not only their subject,…

George Washington’s Diary

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: diary-image Museum Number: Annotation: Both a manuscript and a printed book, George Washington’s 1762 almanac records activities at his Mount Vernon plantation. He describes mainly planting tobacco and raising cattle and sheep, although finance and slaves are also mentioned. Washington kept a diary from 1747, when he was a teen aged surveyor,…

Baptism of Pocahontas, 1614

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: Like the other seventeenth-century British colonies, Virginia aspired to convert the native populations. The Virginia Company’s instructions to its governors required them to make conversion one of their objectives. The most famous early convert was Pocahontas, daughter of Powhatan, head of the Powhatan Confederacy. Pocahontas was baptized by…

Epistola . . . de Insulis Indie nuper inventis (Letter Concerning the Islands Recently Discovered. . . .); wrtitten by Christopher Columbus, 1492

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: print Museum Number: Annotation: After his first transatlantic voyage, Christopher Columbus sent an account of his encounters in the Americas to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain. Several copies of his manuscript were made for court officials, and a transcription was published in April 1493. This Latin translation by Leandro de…

Francis Drake’s Voyage in an Early Map

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: map Museum Number: Annotation: Italian artist Baptista Boazio created these handsome hand-colored engravings to accompany A summarie and true discourse of Sir Francis Drake’s West Indian Voyage, published in London by Biggs and Croftes in 1588-1589. The maps are illustrated in fascinating detail with the fleet of twenty-three ships, as well as…

Discovery of the Mississippi

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: DeSoto’s discovery of the Mississippi Year: 1855

Colonial Era

The Eliakim Hayden Stone

Credit: Wesleyan University Press Media type: gravestone Museum Number: Annotation: Eliakam Hayden grave in Essex, CT, 1797 Year: 1797

The Statue of Freedom

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: statue Museum Number: Annotation: The bronze Statue of Freedom by Thomas Crawford is the crowning feature of the dome of the United States Capitol. The statue is a classical female figure of Freedom wearing flowing draperies. Her right hand rests upon the hilt of a sheathed sword; her left holds a…

Early National Period

The Trapper’s Last Shot

PICTORIAL REFERENCE COPYNot to be reproduced in any form withoutwritten permission in advance from:Rights and ReproductionsThe Bancroft LibraryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeley, CA 94720-6000Please refer to filenameFor more information:http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/reference/dsu/ Credit: The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: Trapper’s Last Shot Year: 1850

Kindred Spirits

Credit: The New York Public Library Media type: painting Museum Number: Year: 1849

Home Sweet Home

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: engraving Museum Number: LC-USZC4-1661 Annotation: Image of an American family relaxing on a porch, c.1877. Year: 1877

Joaquin, the Mountain Robber

Credit: California History Room, California State Library, Sacramento, California Media type: engraving Museum Number: Annotation: Joaquin Murrieta (sometimes spelled Murieta or Murietta) (1829–ca. 1853), also called the Mexican or Chilean Robin Hood or the Robin Hood of El Dorado, was a semi-legendary figure in California during the California Gold Rush of the 1850s. Year: 1848

Progress (the Advance of Civilization)

Credit: The Warner Collection of Gulf States Paper Corporation, Tuscaloosa, Alabama Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: Durand, Progress Year: 1853

Outrage

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: broadside Museum Number: Annotation: This handbill urging opponents of abolitionists to obstruct an anti-slavery meeting demonstrates the depth of pro-slavery feeling. Although the handbill advocates peaceful means, violence sometimes erupted between the two factions. An emotion-laden handbill was a factor in the well-known Boston riot of October 21, 1835. In that incident,…

Pre-Civil War

Declaration of the Anti-Slavery Convention

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: broadside Museum Number: Portfolio 153, Folder 26 Annotation: Sixty abolitionist leaders from ten states met in Philadelphia in 1833 to create a national organization to bring about the immediate emancipation of all slaves. This organization was named the American Anti-slavery Society, and the participants elected officers and adopted a constitution and declaration. ,…

$150 Reward For Runaway

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: advertisement Museum Number: Portfolio 22, Folder 12b Annotation: Advertisement run in Kentucky newspaper ofering up to a $150 reward for the return of a runaway slave named Henry May. Even with the passage of fugitive slave legislature in the mid 19th century and the persistant use of “slave catchers”, advertisements offering rewards for…

Plantation Economy in the Old South

Credit: The Warner Collection of Gulf States Paper Corporation, Tuscaloosa, Alabama Media type: painting Museum Number: Annotation: Plantation Life Year: 1876

(Untitled)

Credit: The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles Media type: photograph Museum Number: Year: 1862

Slavery in America

War

Credit: Architect of the Capitol Media type: fresco Museum Number: Annotation: Capitol fresco Year: 1865

Emancipation Proclamation

Credit: Media type: miscellaneous-image Museum Number: NWCTB-11-PRDOCPI159E23-PROC95 Annotation: This is an image of the first page of the Emancipation Proclamation, the executive order issued by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, declaring the freedom of all slaves held in areas of the United States still controlled by the Confederacy that had not yet been returned to union control and…

In the Swamp

Credit: Library of Congress Media type: painting Museum Number: LC-USZC4-2522 Year: 1863

John Brown’s Fort

Credit: Harpers Ferry National Historic Park Media type: photograph Museum Number: catalog #hf-0379 Year: 1885